File under:
#pmmm #art

魔法少女まどかマギカ~

(Source: swirlpuff)

File under:
#bahahahaha #gpoy

whatshouldwecallmedschool:

File under:
#art

beneviolentskytreader:

"Creation"

working on a piece to go with this 

File under:
#legend of zelda

lesueurpeas:

i guess this falls under racebending…idk anything about LOZ i just wanted to draw egyptian queen zelda tbh

senshi-moon-empire:

Sailor Moon Screencap Re-Draw 06 by Emily-Fay

japhers:

violently Filipino Cecil because yaaaaas

File under:
#art #got
victoriousvocabulary:

REGINAL
[noun]
1. queen.
2. the official title of a queen.
[adjective] 
3. of or relating to a queen; queenly.
Etymology: ultimately from Latin rēgīna.
[a-hour - Mother of Dragons]

victoriousvocabulary:

REGINAL

[noun]

1. queen.

2. the official title of a queen.

[adjective]

3. of or relating to a queen; queenly.

Etymology: ultimately from Latin rēgīna.

[a-hour - Mother of Dragons]

zeus-world:

I feel like they’re in fantasy video game. Also I love Delphox design. 

Member: めるはけ100 元kome100

(Source: moonieswag)

dream-faerie:

fairy—blood:

✧

(Source: oshiokiyo)

File under:
#what

(Source: banderboucher)

File under:
#s ross browne #art

medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!

S. Ross Browne

Series: Self-Evident Truths

from the artist’s statement:

These paintings represent a modern study in dichotomy and perception from a historical context using portraiture as the interpretive engine.

I often use the image of the black woman in unaccustomed/atypical context; derived to create a visual tension between historical fact, misinformation and myth. The viewer is lured into the possible narrative of the depicted figure by her beauty, strength and grace; however immediately enters an intellectual menagerie where they are confounded by the disconnected visual clues. Is she slave or slaveholder? Is she captive or free, is she servant or served? Is she factual or fictional in a historical context? All of these questions and more provide basis for the individual viewers journey of allegorical interpretation.

The images are imbued with cultural and ethnic symbolism that provides insight into the historical context of the painting. Yet, the icons, combined with my personal visual vocabulary, may remain unseen or misread by the “unknowing” eye; the eye that never learned the historic bases for all the possibilities in the lives of these women. In a society that often make instant cultural judgements based on visual cues that are often stereotypical, but not always, I feel offering ethnic imagery that defies common visual library of the modern citizen may challenge each individuals biases and foregone conclusions of their own notions of what race represents in history and therefore in humanity.

The images beg the question: Is “Truth” self-evident? Who’s “Truth”? How does knowledge, experience and perception of one’s “self” determine what is evident? If the view of oneself is skewed is it possible to see another clearly?

— Grace Jones